Authenticity

StoryLTD provides an assurance on behalf of the seller that each object we offer for sale is genuine and authentic.

Read More...
Lot No :

SALMAN RUSHDIE (b.1947)

TWO STORIES BY SALMAN RUSHDIE: WITH FIVE WOODCUTS AND THREE LINOCUTS BY BHUPEN KHAKHAR


Estimate: Rs 74,000-Rs 1,48,000 ( $1,000-$2,000 )


Two Stories by Salman Rushdie: With Five Woodcuts and Three Linocuts by Bhupen Khakhar

Cambridge: Privately printed, 1989

With five linocuts and three woodcuts by Bhupen Khakhar, printed on Arches Velin paper with deckled edges, and dark mustard coloured end papers. Boards are bound in chocolate brown cloth with leather and gilt motif pasted on the front board and leather and gilt title strip on the spine. Original slipcase

33 x 25 x 3 cm

Privately printed, and First Edition, one of 60 copies bound in cloth.
Signed by Rushdie to the limitation page. This is an unnumbered copy.


PROVENANCE
Private Collection, UK

Bhupen Khakhar's artistic path led him to interact and form relationships with several well-known individuals in the literary world, from poets Nissim Ezekiel and Adil Jussawalla, to the celebrated novelist Salman Rushdie. The latter first saw the Khakhar's paintings at the Festival of India in UK in 1981-82, where the artist was part of a group show of contemporary Indian artists, including those from the Baroda school who painted in the quintessential narrative style. Shortly after, Rushdie returned to India to promote his recently released novel Midnight's Children. On his promotional tour, he gave a talk at the Faculty of Fine Arts at the M S University of Baroda, where he praised Khakhar, commenting on his intuitive style of painting.

Over the years, the novelist and the artist maintained a friendship, often paying homage to each other through their work. In Rushdie's 1995 novel The Moor's Last Sigh, he depicts a character called "the accountant," based on Khakhar. The same year, Rushdie chose Khakhar to paint his commissioned portrait for the National Portrait Gallery, London. The painting was incidentally titled The Moor, as a nod to Rushdie's book.

The present lot is perhaps the earliest collaboration between the two. Privately published in 1989, this book is a special and limited edition publication of two stories written by Rushdie, for which the artist produced a series of wood-cut illustrations. The combination of Rushdie's storytelling with Khakhar's narrative style of figuration, make the present lot a rare and unique cross-disciplinary collectible from the best of Indian art and literature.